Smooth Muscle Hamartoma

If you try to Google this you’ll find that there’s not a whole lot of anecdotal information out there. (You can find some gnarly images too.) But, what I mean is that there is not a whole lot of people talking about them. We noticed Isla had a mark on her back at birth. Since she came out with her hand by her face and was pretty bruised we assumed her mark on her back was also a bruise (I pushed her out really fast).

At her first pediatric visit her doctor asked another doctor to look at the mark to see what it was (this other doc was not a dermatologist but was really interested in pediatric skin lesions and knew a lot about them). They took a photo and sent it off to a bunch of colleagues to get more information and to determine if it really was a smooth muscle hamartoma. It was. A few weeks later I noticed a smallish spot (about the size of my thumb nail) on Isla’s inner thigh near her butt. She was really dark when she was born (my father’s side is Portugese) and her skin color has slowly lightened so it’s made seeing these a lot easier than it was right after she was born.

So is it bad? Not really. They are usually benign and cause no damage to a person. The hamartomas will probably grow with Isla as she grows. The one on her back is a little fuzzy and feels rougher than her skin does but it’s not as noticeable as it is in the pictures below. Some people say these will go away, others say they’ll grow. Isla’s doctor thinks it may grow with her but we aren’t really sure yet. They don’t cause her any pain at all but we will just keep watching them and taking pictures to document if they change in any way. When she is about a year old we will take her to a pediatric dermatologist just to get their opinion– but for now we’re just waiting. If these do grow with her and she feels insecure about them in any way we will absolutely have them removed, regardless of them not being dangerous, it’ll be her decision.

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9 thoughts on “Smooth Muscle Hamartoma

  1. Hi there
    Is your baby hamaronas are hairy, my daughter is one year old she has a skin color one on her shoulder i took her to dermatologist says it will never desapear and that will grow with her but no need to be removed, nothing malignant just hairy , she also mention this may become a Bekers nevus that really scare me other than this Im looking fwd to gave hers removed if gets hard to look at 😉

    1. Just the one on her back is fuzzy. We just saw her doc for her 4 month check up and the one on her back looks lighter than before but the one on her thigh looks a bit darker/vascular.

      We are thinking the same as you; if it gets big of bothers her we will absolutely remove them. I thought the Bekers Nevus only really affected males? Are you worried about it? We haven’t seem a dermatologist yet but plan on having them look at the hamartomas when Isla is a year old.

      1. Our son is almost 5 months old now, and was also diagnosed with smooth muscle hamartoma. He has a darkened patch across his lower back since birth. Have you noticed if your daughter’s patches change in appearance? For example, our’s son’s patch will become raised, usually if he is crying. Otherwise, it looks very similar to the pictures you posted and isn’t readily noticeable.

      2. I do notice the one on Isla’s back changes in appearance but the one on her thigh is usually always the same. It is the same as your son–if Isla has been crying or is hot the one on her back is darker. For the most part it seems a lot lighter than it was at birth though. I think as parents, we notice everything! Did your doctor say to just keep watching it and that it would go away?

      3. Basically the dermatologist said to keep an eye on it and we’d follow up every so often with her. She didn’t seem overly concerned, and said that it most likely isn’t a problem. I don’t think she said it would go away though, just continue to be there, and maybe grow in proportion to everything else as our son ages.

        I was just curious because diagnosing these things, especially without a biopsy, can be tough. Our son also had congenital polycystic renal displasyia, and we’re trying to determine if the spot may be related. One thing that the doctor mentioned was tubular sclerosis, but so far his skin patch doesn’t seem to align with the symptoms. I came across your blog when searching for pictures and info for the hamartoma and figured that getting your description might be helpful in confirming our son’s diagnosis, so thanks for the reply!

  2. Hi. I think that my daughter may have smooth muscle hamartoma on her back. But it’s strange. it’s completely flat has some hair on it but it disappear when I touch it. Is Isla’s hamartomas act like that? Under pressure it’s fading but after that it is more distinct but still is completely flat.

    1. Isla’s is kind of like that. It’s much more noticeable when wet. If I touch it it kinda fades and then is more visible. Have you asked your predict ricin? Ours had to take photos and send them to a few other doctors to verify what it was.

      1. our doctor isn’t concerned about that. It’s usually barely visible. Sometimes I can’t see it but when I touch it, it becomes more prominent. It’s small -7×5 mm. Do your hamartomas looks like swelling? Are they raised above skin level? Our isn’t. When I press, it disappear completely. The skin texture isn’t diffrent from the skin around it. Please, please write some more about it 🙂 At first I thought it is just a skin irritation or a vascular nevus but recently there are some hair on it. She also has some hair on lower back, arms so I’m rubbing it with towel after bathing and it is almost gone- on this funny spot albo hair became rarer.

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